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Top 3 Reasons You Need the Rynski Doggie Dictionary

rynski doggie dictionary

More than 80 full-color dog cartoons. A humorous take on dog terms, expressions and proverbs. A basic dog info section that helps to ensure you don’t mess with an angry hound. If these reasons simply aren’t enough to convince you to buy your copy of The Rynski Doggie Dictionary, perhaps these next three reasons are.

Here’s what the doggie dictionary can do for you:

raining cats and dogs
raining cats and dogs, illustration from the rynski doggie dictionary

Help you wow the crowd at dinner parties

You’re at one of those stale dinner engagements where, alas, the hottest topic of conversation is the weather. Rather than yawning along with the rest of the crowd, you can perk up the entire party with your astounding knowledge of dog expressions and proverbs.

This is especially a propos since someone just so happened to mention it was raining cats and dogs. Since you read The Rynski Doggie Dictionary, you have the full background on that expression, as well as several others. Suddenly the party is a total blast. Someone even started dancing naked on the table!

let sleeping dogs lie
let sleeping dogs lie, illustration from the rynski doggie dictionary

Earn you extra cash

Whether you’re trying to save money to buy a new robot vacuum or your overall workflow is slow, extra income is always welcome. With The Rynski Doggie Dictionary at your side, you’ll have the knowledge you need to earn it, pronto. You can find instant employment as a fortune cookie writer.

The dog proverbs you find inside the book provide you with fabulous fodder for penning those fortunes.

  • Let sleeping dogs lie.
  • Children aren’t dogs; adults aren’t gods.
  • Every dog is allowed one bite.

Yep, you’ll soon be watching the millions roll on in, thanks to the proverbs in this cartoon dog book.

dog anatomy cartoon
dog anatomy cartoon from book. flews are no. 7, btw.

Increase your chances of going to heaven

Let’s say you’re at the gates of heaven and you have to answer a single question to get in. A massive angel stands before you with one simple inquiry: “What are flews?”

If you read the Rynski Doggie Dictionary, you’d remember flews were mentioned in the dog Basic Body Parts section. It’s simply a term used to describe a dog’s lips. The harps play, the gates open, and you live happily ever after in paradise.

Sound good to you? Then get your copy of The Rynski Doggie Dictionary today!

Thanks in advance for helping to support a Tucson artist, writer, and dog Reiki practitioner (who is diligently applying for positions as a fortune cookie writer).

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Have You Tried PaintNite Yet?

paintnite tucson

Sitting around talking to your dogs and binging on Netflix is absolutely dreamy, but the thrill can only last so long. Sooner or later you’ll be itching to get out of the house to protect your sanity. This usually occurs when you’re watching “Women Behind Bars” for the eighth time – or your dogs start talking back.

That’s when you know it’s time to try PaintNite.

What’s PaintNite?

Billed as the “original creative nite out,” PaintNite involves a very casual, full-of-fun group class of sorts where you all work on painting your version of whatever picture is on the canvas up front. Local artists host the event, so you’re apt to meet talented, friendly and really cool people. This counts for the teacher as well as the people in the crowd.

You don’t find too many people in bad moods when they’re eating, laughing and tapping into creativity while playing with paint. The event is held at local venues, which can include restaurants, coffee shops, hotels, bars or other places that don’t mind a bit of paint on the chairs or floor.

What You Do

Round up a few pals, whether they think they have any artistic talent or not, and promise them they’ll LOL if they go to PaintNite with you.

Head online to search for PaintNite options in your location, picking a painting that doesn’t make you vomit. (Yeah, some are pretty cheesy, but others are fabulously cool). Book your desired date, then show up to LOL.

Get there about 30 minutes early so you can order food and drinks if available. This will also help you get a seat that’s not crammed in the back with an unobstructed view of the bathroom.

Why You Need to Try It

The event is just too much fun. I attended one at Mimi’s Café in Tucson with pals Vicky and Lynn (pictured above). We laughed. We cried. We spilled things. In short, we had a rollicking good time.

OK, we didn’t cry, but we could have since we were laughing so hard. And I don’t think anyone spilled anything, either, although I did come close to making a major mess when I nearly dipped an apron string in the paint palette when I was trying to position the apron to save Vicky’s seat.

Part of the fun came from our talented instructor, Tucson artist Kimberly Tipton, whose creativity spans the board from blacksmithing to painting Van Gogh reproductions as a toddler. She set down the one and only rule for our class:

Don’t Hate on Your Painting

Everyone’s painting is going to be different, unique – and good, no matter what you may think. The point is to unleash your creative spirit and have fun, not obsess about making your painting look exactly like the example up front. Spewing negative energy not only hurts the creative flow, but it defeats the entire purpose of the evening. Let go, enjoy and love what you create instead.

 

Additional tips for making the most of PaintNite include:

Get discounted tickets: Groupon is always running PaintNite specials, and you can usually score a discount on the PaintNite website itself if you poke around enough before buying.

Don’t expect to look good in the apron: It’s green. It’s baggy. And it tends to make even athletic types look like a dowdy fat housewife. Don’t sweat it. At least it’s protecting your clothes.

Feel free to add your own creative spin: In PaintNite circles, veering away from the example painting is called “going rogue.” And Kimberly said some of the coolest PaintNite painting’s she’s seen came from those gone rogue. I went semi-rogue to add a layer of meaning to my PaintNite creation.

paintnite tucson painting
PaintNite painting gone semi-rogue.

Rogue elements include collection of yellow-eyed monsters along the terrain and spiritual beings in the sky. Clouds were crafted to pay tribute to those who have died and gone to heaven, including Dad and dog Sawyer (aka The Bubble).

Love what you see? Head to PaintNite to create your own masterpiece.

Or head to rynski’s etsy shop for additional art and inspiration.

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The Four Agreements: What Happens when They Go Wrong

inspirational magnets four agreements

More than once I’ve heard people say they wished life came with a manual. Well, it kind of does. That manual is the book entitled “The Four Agreements: A Practical Guide to Personal Freedom” by Don Miguel Ruiz.

My mind was so blown when I picked up this tome that I started making art in its honor even before I turned the final page. Living the four agreements affords a fantastic way of life – but remembering to live them is a different story.

The Four Agreements are:

  1. Be impeccable with your word.
  2. Never take anything personally.
  3. Don’t make assumptions.
  4. Always do your best.

One of the ways I ingrain the four agreements into my mind is to recall times when they went wrong, or the misery I felt before I even knew these agreements existed.

Here come real-life examples of the first two agreements gone wrong, with the other two covered in another blog post. Enjoy!

four agreements first agreement

First Agreement: Be Impeccable with Your Word

Words have power. Loads of power. And you can’t take them back once you unleash them into the world. Choose your words carefully. Live up to what you say. And proofread for typos before you publish anything on the front page.

Example of First Agreement Gone Wrong

The front page of the Brooklyn newspaper where I worked ran a mini-feature on a lost subway tunnel tour. The tunnel had been recently unearthed and was now open to the public.

Our front-page story was supposed to have said the tunnel had been “sealed shut” for a number of years. But it instead said it was “sealed shit.”

The lady who gave us the info was convinced we did it on purpose. She was so mad her yelling nearly broke the phone speaker when she called to complain. I still went on the tour, but I didn’t dare tell anyone I was from the newspaper.

four agreements second agreement

Second Agreement: Don’t Take Anything Personally

Someone cuts you off in traffic. Another moves your computer to sit at your desk. A third says you remind him of his dog. No, the world is not out to get you. Even the people who are seemingly saying or doing things that are directed at you aren’t out to get you. People’s actions and reactions are a reflection of the state of their own mind and soul, not yours.

Example of Second Agreement Gone Wrong

Another newspaper story comes to mind here, but one that happened much later when online comments first started getting popular. Those things were nasty from the get-go, and they only got nastier as time marched on.

One online story I wrote resulted in a massive attack from all angles, with commenters calling me names, bemoaning my very existence, and telling me how I should be thrown off an overpass and run over by a Mack truck.

My first reaction was to cry and hide. I was, after all, a terrible person who deserved to be killed by an overpass-Mack-truck combo. But then I started looking more closely at all their nasty words. Many of the commenters referred to me as “he” or “him,” while others were attacking things that didn’t even relate to me, like blond hair or having a pet kangaroo named Sam.

Right then and there I realized that, even when you appear to the target of a slight or attack, it’s not about you. It’s about the other person. They’re the ones with the rage, self-righteousness, intolerance or other issues that twist them into a snit.

You’re really not part of the equation at all. You just happened to stir up their snit-making feelings. So it’s too bad on them – not you!

While this agreement is one of the toughest for me to live, it’s also one of the most freeing. Whew and yahoo when I get it right. And although I did once have blond hair, I never had a kangaroo named Sam.

Check out the third and fourth agreements, now available on a blogski near you!

Check out Four Agreement art if you’re digging the message.

four agreements metal sign
Four Agreements Metal Sign
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Art Therapy Project: SATISFACTION

satisfaction cat art therapy

When the topic of SATISFACTION was proposed for our art therapy project, my mind immediately hopped to the Cheshire cat with his infamous grin. So I knew I had to create a cat.

  • Topic: Satisfaction
  • Result: Satisfaction cat made of pen, ink, glitter glue and paint on canvas. Note the illustrations within the cat’s body that depict different things that bring me satisfaction.

Artist comments:

While the Cheshire cat was definitely the primary motivator for creating a cat for the topic of satisfaction, he wasn’t the only one. Cats in general kept coming to mind with this topic. Not only is cat art fun to create, but felines frequently look very satisfied with themselves. Maybe it’s because they:

  • Sleep 18 hours a day
  • Do what they want, when they want
  • Ignore or even shun people yet still get love and attention
  • Can jump extraordinary distances
  • Always manage to land on their feet
  • Are thought to have magical, mystical, supernatural powers
  • Have nine different lives to play around with

Dang good reasons to be satisfied.

The topic also made me think of a cat perched high in the cat bird seat, next to an open bird cage, with the kind of contented grin one can only get from eating the resident bird.

I didn’t want to use the idea of eating small feathered things as the only way to be satisfied, so I let that last thought flutter out of my head altogether.

My final project result was a non-bird-eating Satisfaction Cat, featuring a rosy pink, glittery outlook, a collage of images representing things that bring me satisfaction, and a sensationally satisfied smile.

Enjoy!

satisfaction cat art therapy
Things that bring satisfaction:: Hummingbird, sunshine
satisfaction cat art therapy
Things that bring satisfaction: Planets, pulling out a splinter
satisfaction cat art therapy
Things that bring satisfaction: Flowers, garden, hugs, purple swirls from Biomat energy, headstand on a paddle board
satisfaction cat art therapy
Things that bring satisfaction: Love, dogs, lifting weights, naps, making money, LOL-ing, phone calls with mom, job well done

Dig the satisfaction cat? Check out more fun felines and other animals at rynski’s etsy shop.

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Dos and Don’ts for Painting Your Bathtub

paint bathtub

Bathtubs and shower areas are supposed to be places where you get squeaky clean. When they’re streaked with water stains, corrosion, and weird brown filth that only seem to get darker the more you scrub, it’s high time to do something about it.

Unless you have the cash to pay for a new whirlpool tub its hefty installation, that something involves painting the bathtub and shower area. I did it myself with pretty amazing results, so I’m sharing some dandy dos and don’ts.

Don’t pick the same bland color (aka white). Repainting your bathtub and shower area gives you a chance to pick a groovy color that makes your tub a showpiece. I went with battleship grey and black.

Do get the right kind of coating. Crayola markers won’t cut it. The same holds true for indoor spray paint, outdoor spray paint or basically anything not specifically designed for a constant flow of water, shampoo, soap scum and dirty feet.

Research led me to KlassKote, which is some incredibly heavy duty stuff. It’s a waterproof epoxy paint that can stick to basically any surface as long as you prepare the surface properly.

Don’t skimp on properly preparing the surface. If the stuff doesn’t stick, you’ll just have to do it over. Nobody wants that. Proper preparation involves filling in missing or rotting caulk, scrub-a-dubbing off existing soap scum, sanding all surfaces, wiping off the sanding dust, and applying a coat of epoxy thinner that smells like the bowels of hell.

Do wear a chemical mask. I skipped this step, a very big error. My fault, not the company’s, as it does have a clear warning (I read after I nearly passed out twice from the fumes and bowels-of-hell smell from both the thinner and the epoxy paint).

Don’t expect a good shower, or any shower, for at least four days. It takes the stuff at least four days to fully cure in temperatures between 75 and 80 degrees. If your house is cooler, expect to wait at least a week.

Do make good friends with the YMCA front desk people down the street in the hopes they’ll let you take a free shower.

Don’t arrive at the YMCA without the $10 for the daily guest pass they’ll make you buy to take a shower.

Do replace the hardware. No use in perking up your bathtub and shower with new paint if you’re just going to put the same old corroded faucet, handle and shower head.

Don’t expect all faucet systems to be created equal. Unless you purchase the same brand as your existing hardware, it’s likely the installation will require ripping open part of the wall to install new valves and pipe fittings.

Do keep your receipts. That way you can return the new brand when it doesn’t fit and use the money to buy the same brand as your existing hardware.

Don’t try to put on the new faucet when you’re tired, cranky and fed up with life. It will result in a tantrum when the faucet shoots off and creates a fat ding in your brand-new, epoxied tub.

Do keep extra epoxy so you can fix up dings when needed. Store it in a temperature-controlled environment, like the hall closet instead of the garage or outdoor shed. Otherwise it may blow up and create bowels-of-hell stench and fumes throughout the entire neighborhood. (I DID heed the warning on that one.)

bathtub before painting
Bathtub before painting. Yuck.
bathtub after painting
Bathtub after painting. Yum.
bathtub before painting
Bathtub before painting, putrid bottom and drain.
bathtub after painting
Bathtub after painting, sensational bottom and drain (especially when I put the drain cover on after the photo).

You can complete the whole project in a few hours if you’re properly prepared. If you give it a whirl, let me know how it goes!

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