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Save the world: join the Voluntary Human Extinction Movement

Really want to save the world?

Stop breeding.

Illustration Ryn Gargulinski
Illustration Ryn Gargulinski

That’s the strategy behind a new trend on the scene called The Voluntary Human Extinction Movement.

Rules are easy:
Don’t have kids.

If you already have a bustling house filled with tots, it’s OK. You can still join the movement by passing on the wealth of ideas and information to your offspring.

One caveat is to make sure all the extinction is natural and voluntary. That means don’t go killing off your neighbors or yourself. Just don’t add to the population going forward.

Want to learn more? Check out The Voluntary Human Extinction Movement
The motto is: “Where we live long and die out.”

Have a nice day.

Do you think the Voluntary Human Extinction Movement is a good idea?
Will you and your children join in?

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Sex offender nabbed after sending naked photos to 14-year-old girl

One 14-year-old girl who thought she was simply texting a 14-year-old boy ended up being sent photos of naked body parts of a 48-year-old man.

When the girl’s mom saw the pictures of the private parts and other photos on her daughter’s phone, she went to police, Sgt. Fabian Pacheco said in a news release.

Terry Martin
Terry Martin/TPD photo

Tucson police officers were able to identify Terry W. Martin from the photos he sent the girl and arrested him.

Martin, who just so happens to be a level three sex offender, was booked into Pima County Jail on one felony count of furnishing harmful items to minors, Pacheco said.

Flashers, especially those who flash over the phone to 14-year-olds, have always been a sick lot.

The worst I ran into was in a supermarket parking lot back in Brooklyn. The guy was sitting in his car beeping his horn so folks would look over and notice he was exposing himself.

Don’t these guys have anything better to do?

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Arizona man busted for pretending to be a Marine

We’ve all know folks who exaggerate a bit, perhaps say they run a business when all they really do is run the business’s trash out the Dumpster.

But one Arizona guy went above and beyond simple exaggeration and claimed to be a highly decorated U.S. Marine.

John William Rodriguez, 31, didn’t save his faux boasting for dates or personal chats, either, but made it widely known to the masses.

This Scottsdale guy was even introduced at large functions as a decorated veteran.

That’s also how he got busted.

An authentic former Marine thought Rodriguez’s uniform looked a little less than authentic. He also found it odd that a 31-year-old would be donning the Navy Cross.

Once the Arizona Department of Public Safety started investigating they learned Rodriguez had been introduced as a decorated veteran at several functions. He also listed serving in the military on his driver’s license.

Arizona Department of Public Safety arrests suspected military impersonator, news release

John William Rodriquez, 31, of Scottsdale was booked into the Maricopa County Jail on 13 felony fraud schemes stemming from his impersonation of a highly decorated Marine. The arrest culminates a lengthy investigation which uncovered evidence that Rodriquez had been portraying himself as a U.S. Marine Gunnery Sergeant or Warrant Officer for at least a year.

Rodriquez faces possible federal charges in addition to his arrest for ARS Title 13 Felony Fraud Schemes.

Wow. That’s some heavy charges for pretending to be a Marine. Guess no one gets away with nabbing a military title if they haven’t been through boot camp.

Poor guy. I say “poor” because you have to be suffering from very low self-esteem to blow yourself up into a decorated veteran.

Not sure what the penalty will be, but maybe he should really be sent to boot camp. Either that, or shine the shoes of all the authentic decorated veterans out there.

Did you ever get busted pretending to be someone or something you are not?
Did it result in felony fraud charges?

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Taser to blame for death, angry grandma

Tasers, which happen to come in leopard print and hot pink, can be a very useful weapon that serves to quell without killing – usually.

Boring old black taser
Boring old black taser

Sometimes the suppression method can freakishly backfire and lead to death.

Other times the taser can be abused, misused or over-used and lead to death.

In still other instances, the taser can be used properly and according to procedure but still cause a stink because the victim happens to be somebody’s grandma.

If someone is mouthing off, resisting arrest and refusing to comply with the officer’s wishes, a zap with a taser seems like a reasonable answer. Even if the victim is somebody’s grandma.

Such was the case of a 72-year-old woman in Texas who claimed she was tasered for no reason. Then the dashcam video came out.

It shows her swearing, arguing and being a tad less than cooperative.

Why anyone would argue with Texas law enforcement is beyond me. They have too much to prove and definitely fall into the “just-say-yes-and-do-whatever-they-say” category.

In Tucson, a taser death in April was just ruled a homicide by the Pima County Medical Examiner’s Office.

Gary Decker, 50, died in a motel after he lunged naked at officers who were called to the scene.

Original Day of the Dead post: Died after attacking police: Gary A. Decker, 50
Gary A. Decker, 50, died after he attacked police and was shocked with a Taser in the early morning hours of April 16. He died later that day in the hospital, a Tucson police spokesman said.

Decker, from Kentucky, was residing at the Extended Stay America at 5050 E. Grant Road, while working a temporary job as a furniture liquidator

Motel management reported hearing noises, music, banging and moaning coming from the upstairs room.

Officers entered the room with a passkey and found the room ransacked and furniture broken, (Sgt. Mark) Robinson said. Decker was in the bathroom, clutching a toilet seat he had ripped off the unit.

Decker grabbed one of the officers, Robinson said, and the officer shocked him with a Taser. The Taser appeared to have no effect on him.

Officers handcuffed Decker, got him out of the bathroom and called paramedics, which is standard practice when someone a Taser is used.

Decker became unresponsive, Robinson said, and was unconscious when paramedics arrived.

If someone is in a rage, ripping toilet seats off the basin and lunging naked at police, a taser may be just the thing to calm the guy down. It was later determined he had also been high on cocaine, which just adds to irrationality.

But was the taser overused?

According to the Arizona Daily Star:
Gary A. Decker, 50, died from a combination of cocaine intoxication, multiple blunt force injuries and being restrained after he assaulted three police officers (according to the medical examiner’s autopsy report)….

The Tucson Police Department is still investigating the case and has forwarded it to the Pima County Attorney’s Office for review. Neither agency would comment Wednesday on the incident.

According to the autopsy report, Decker suffered two puncture wounds to his chest and additional wounds to his right hip when he was Tasered.

He also received numerous rib fractures, the report states.

Decker had cuts and bruises all over his body, including his head, neck, abdomen, shoulders and arms, the report states.

Jan. 2004: Brian Sewell's neck shows the effect of being shocked three times with 50,000 volts of electricity by a sheriff's deputy to secure Sewell's compliance for a blood draw in a DUI case.
TASER WOUND EXAMPLE - Jan. 2004: Brian Sewell's neck shows the effect of being shocked three times with 50,000 volts of electricity by a sheriff's deputy to secure Sewell's compliance for a blood draw in a DUI case.

How many tasers blasts did the guy get? Or were the broken ribs and other injuries from Decker throwing himself against the wall or toilet or some other cause?

Still too many questions that need answers, but the fact is clear: tasers can kill.

The smart thing would be not to get into a situation where you may have the opportunity to get zapped by one. The other smart thing would be to opt for the leopard print over hot pink.

What do you think? Are tasers too dangerous, especially to be readily available to the general public?

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Tucson views and nabes trashed by development

Tucson is not known for its skyscrapers, and I used to think it was because builders were just lazy or ran out of materials.

I later realized tall buildings would block the glorious mountain views.

One midtown neighborhood in particular is learning this firsthand, as outlined in a letter written by Kathleen Williamson.

This Feldman’s Historic Neighborhood resident sent the following letter to the Tucson Mayor, City Council, the press and any other cc she could think of. So far she said she’s gotten no response other than officials telling her it was forwarded somewhere to someone why may or may not do something about it.

Here is the Feldman’s Neighborhood Design Manual to which she refers

Letter from Kathleen Williamson to Honorable Tucson Mayor and Council:

I applaud your efforts to try to preserve the character of Feldman’s Historic Neighborhood. The effort, however, falls far short and gives too much in tax break incentives for too little effort on the part of urban density developers.

Historically, Feldman’s is not a two- or more- storied neighborhood. While you have allowed, however, for two-story or higher architecture in your design manual (which includes extensive details and suggestions about privacy and setbacks), I am shocked to discover that there is not one word about vista protection in the 100-plus pages. Most of the properties and strolls around this area provide great vistas of the Rincons, Tucson Mountains and, especially, the Catalinas.

Probably the most important characteristic of these old residential neighborhoods in Tucson is the mountain vistas. If you’ve been around these parts over the last few years, however, you’d see view after view being occluded by two story monstrosities that were built by developer Michael Goodman (who, ironically, is a non-resident panelist on the
NPZ Feldman’s Design Committee).

My views, which were part of the value of my property as well as a big contribution to my quality of life, are being ripped off more and more with each passing day. It’s become an aggravating and heartbreaking sight to behold from my house, which I have owned and lived in since 1991. My front porch used to be a pleasurable summer place to
sit and watch the monsoon storms come in over the Catalinas. Those experiences have been taken away. Now there are two two-story buildings where Pusch Ridge used to be, and two more will be built very soon obstructing the rest of the Catalina range.

My dear friend and neighbor across the street, Mrs. Canara Price, is almost 96 years old and has lived in her house since the early sixties. Her adobe house is over 100 years old. Right now, Michael Goodman is building four of his two story monstrosities at the edge of her backyard to the north and more two-story structures on the north side of the 300 Elm Street block. Mrs. Price has lost her privacy, quietude and mountain views without a request, apology, or compensation. She technically doesn’t live in Feldman’s but right across the street, on the north side of Lee.

Come on, Tucson. We can do better than this for the people who live here.

There needs to be view protection for the overall area, if not more of Tucson proper. The neighborhood just north of Feldman’s is falling prey to Michael Goodman and other developers. Much of Elm Street (one block north of Feldman’s) has been purchased by M. Goodman, and the properties near the Goodman lots suffer to the degree that they sell or will eventually have to sell (for cheap…to guess who!). Those strips of land are just north of Feldman’s, close enough that two-story and higher structures will permanently change the character of Feldman’s. What is Feldman’s, or Tucson, without views of the mountains?

Architecture does not thrive in a vacuum; it thrives in a visual context. Please make changes to the design manual to create incentives for vista preservation and vista corridors.

More importantly, the vista corridors and wide-open views also provide a free flow of breezes and air. Feldman’s is in a low lying area of this valley and is surrounded by four major arterial motorways (especially with the upcoming “improvements” and broadening of Grant Road). If more and more rows of two-story buildings in Feldman and its contiguous neighborhoods are permitted, we will be increasingly trapped in a bowl of stagnant toxic air. In the summer, add “hot” to the list of adjectives. Please give more thought to all of this.

I’d like to add that the design manual also falls short concerning healthy vegetation. The new developments have obliterated the natural desert plants and left absolutely nothing for birds, bees, and other critters (critical to the survival of all species, including ours) to thrive on. The Home Depot mono-palm trees that dominate these new Goodman type developments do not provide the necessary air cleaning and oxygen producing environment we need to be healthy.

The City Council exists first and foremost to protect the health, welfare, and safety of the citizens; not to be a supporter of environmentally destructive developments. As Ed Abbey so eloquently wrote, sometimes development is like a cancer cell, “growth for growth’s sake.”

Regardless, if Feldman’s is destined for change and density because of the expansion of the university population or to reduce urban sprawl, let’s be wise about it. If we aren’t going to be thorough and sincere about quality of life, what’s the use of “planning?”

Please take your heads out of the abstract and put your eyes and feet on the ground where we live.

I wish you the best of all resources and integrity in your endeavors.

Kathleen G. Williamson, J.D., LL.M., Ph.D.

What do you think?

Has your neighborhood fallen prey to detrimental development?

Do you think more thought should go into factors other than making money?

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