Posted on

Unidentified moth named after Tucson woman

Tucsonan Lee Walsh is a lucky woman.

Being married to a University of Arizona biologist must be exciting enough, especially if he keeps jars of fossilized specimens all over the house.

But she got extra excitement when her biologist husband Bruce Walsh, who doubles as a UA professor, discovered an unidentified moth while he was hanging out in the Chiracahua Mountains. The moth is pink, which is Lee’s favorite color.

Thus he named the moth after his beloved wife. Now officially known as “Lithophane leeae,” the moth can stop flitting around aimlessly confused while lacking an identity.

Unidentified Moth Named by UA Biologist, UAnews.org
While he only found a single Lee moth so far …Walsh said he is confident there are bound to be more. “If this thing is flying at the top of the Chiracahuas, it’s probably pretty common,” he said.
Finding it is another matter because moths like Lithophane tend to over-winter at higher elevations, hibernating when there is snow on the ground and flying off at the first signs of spring. Walsh said bats are the primary predators of moths, and so if the insects can make it through the winter, when bats hibernate, they will likely do well as the weather gets warmer.
As to why L. leeae hasn’t been found before, Walsh theorized that his specimen simply emerged late from hibernation when it was caught. Another theory is that it could be a stray from another mountain range in the region. He said there are a number of species that fly early in the summer and are rare in collections and not often seen in most years.

Having a moth named after you is certainly a thrill, much nicer than sharing your moniker with an infectious bacteria or disease. Poor Lou Gehrig.

Others are honored by sharing their names with roadways, parks and special sandwiches at the local deli.

My biggest claim to name fame is having a goat named after me, which is none too shabby if I say so myself.

A goat named Ryn/Photo Ryn Gargulinski
A goat named Ryn/Photo Ryn Gargulinski

What would you name a moth if you discovered one?

Have you ever had anything named after you?

Share
Posted on

Projectile vomiting in the meat aisle

A bloody slasher flick during dinner or watching an eyeball operation while eating grapes is not the kind of stuff that fazes me.

It’s hard to gross out someone who habitually takes photos of dead and rotting things.

But a cell phone conversation I overheard in the lunchmeat aisle at Fry’s Food Store made me pretty sick.

Unpurchased meat/Ryn Gargulinski
Meat left unpurchased/Ryn Gargulinski

A woman was loudly discussing projectile vomiting just as I happened to be staring at some slimy pink meat.

She was wearing one of those colorful scrubs shirts that indicates work at a clinic, so I was glad to learn, at least, she was talking about a patient and not discussing the topic for kicks.

Since she then mentioned isolation and kennel, we can only hope she worked at a veterinarian’s office.

She moved on to loudly discuss projectile stuff coming from the other end. I quickly scampered into frozen foods without buying that meat. And I also steered clear of the peanut butter.

What’s the most disturbing phone cell conversation you overheard?

What do you do when confronted with loud, disgusting conversations?

Should there be a ban on cell phones in the meat aisle?

Share
Posted on

Yappie Yorkie among those honored for saving lives

A yappie Yorkie named Tuffy is just one of 15 honorees recognized for saving a life in the past year.

In addition to Tuffy, the American Red Cross Southern Arizona Chapter’s honorees include seven kids and seven adults who were in the right place at the right time and did the right thing.

While I’m prone to focus in the dog, these life-saving people should get at least equal billing. One of the most amazing was the kid who knew to put sugar in her brother’s mouth when he slipped into a diabetic coma. On second thought, they are all amazing.

2009 Real Heroes:

Tuffy – yapped loud enough to alert his owners to get the heck out of the burning house (pictured with his dad Brad Bishop)

tucdc5-5ojj2ewi4dipbbqtfbo_layout

Cody Pacheco – rushed for help when his dad tumbled and became unconscious on the ski slopes

Sam Gelardi – baseball coach who saved young player when sunflower seeds lodged in the player’s throat and nearly choked the boy to death

Daniel Hoback, Carlos Franco and Carlos Monteverde – saved the life of a Tohono O’Odham police officer whose car was hit and burst into flames

Clayton Trevillyan – rescued a severely bleeding man from the side of the railroad tracks

Jesus Bernal – revived a toddler who nearly drowned in a resort pool

John Wettack – saved his friend from death from a heart attack

Christina Street – 5-year-old who rescued her baby brother from the family’s burning home

Kids Saving Lives Special Heroes Award:

Dannik Batiste – saved brothers from doom when a pizza box caught fire on the stove

Jesse Lesnewski – 8-year-old who placed sugar in her brother’s mouth to get him out of a diabetic coma

Dominique Rodriguez Armstrong – 8-year-old who saved her family from a burning home

Valencia Pierce – 6-year-old who came to her mother’s rescue by calling 911 and providing vital, life-saving information

Tahmani Williams – 12-year-old who rescued uncle, who was in a diabetic coma, by dragging him from a burning home

Read more on the heroes at Red Cross Arizona.

Did you ever save a life or have your life saved?

Do you know any other heroes?

Share
Posted on

Walk your dog for a good cause

Desert dog lovers who want to raise money for a good cause by simply walking a mile with their pooch can do so Saturday. The walk includes a pancake breakfast (for humans only), a complimentary doggie bag and bandanna and a demonstration from the Tucson Police Department K-9s.
SAM TPD POLICE DOG


What:
Canine Walk for Cops to benefit the Tucson Police Foundation

When: 7 a.m. Saturday

Where: La Mariposa Resort, 1501 N. Houghton Road

Cost: $15 for dog and human; $10 for add’l dog with same human; $5 for human only for breakfast

To register: www.tucsonpolicefoundation.org or at 6:30 a.m. before the event

Including pets in fundraisers is a great idea. I’m more inclined to participate in outdoor – or any – activities if I can bring my dogs. For the record, we’ve only been banned from three places so far.

Dogs should be included in other fundraisers and community activities. Canines would be ideal for:

• Digging and ripping out buffelgrass

• Begging for spare change

• Dragging out trash and carcasses from area washes

• Ridding markets and gardens of unwanted cucumbers

What community or fundraising activity would your pet best perform?

Share