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Skeleton Man Frederick: Spooky Cute Metal Art

Who said dead things can’t be cute? This medium skeleton man, named Frederick, is as charming as they come, with wide open arms for easy hugging and a sweet little smirk on his face.

Weatherproof metal and paint for indoor or outdoor use.

Freddie stands approx. 15 inches high x 12 inches wide. Wire loop for easy hanging.

Dead things have never been so entertaining.

Freddie can be yours for $34, plus $9 shipping and handling in the U.S.

Too big? Too small? Custom order a skeleton man – or woman – that fits you to a tee. E-mail ryngargulinski@hotmail.com.





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Veronica Metal Sugar Skull: Sweet and Sassy Skeleton Head

For Halloween, Day of the Dead or any dang day, these fun and funky metal sugar skulls will put a smile on your face.

Fully weatherproof for indoor or outdoor use, each one has a unique shape, design and personality to suit your own.

Dead things have never been so entertaining. Wire loop for easy hanging. Approx. 11 inches high x 9 inches wide.

Veronica is a sweet $26, plus $9 shipping and handling in the U.S.

Want to design your own metal sugar skull? Go for it with a customized version. E-mail details to ryngargulinski@hotmail.com.





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Bobo Metal Sugar Skull: Creepy yet Cute Skeleton Head

For Halloween, Day of the Dead or any dang day, these fun and funky metal sugar skulls will put a smile on your face.

Fully weatherproof for indoor or outdoor use, each one has a unique shape, design and personality to suit your own.

Dead things have never been so entertaining. Wire loop for easy hanging. Approx. 8 inches high x 12 inches wide.

Bobo goes for $26, plus $9 shipping and handling in the U.S.

Want to design your own metal sugar skull? Go for it with a customized version. E-mail details to ryngargulinski@hotmail.com.





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Dead things make lively art – slide show

Dead things don’t always belong in a grave. They make some fantastic art.

Dead thing in a chair/Art and photo Ryn Gargulinski
Dead thing made from cow bones sitting in a backyard chair/Art and photo Ryn Gargulinski

We’re not talking about art that simply depicts dead things, like Georgia O’Keeffe’s skull-happy paintings or a rendition of the suicidal Marat slumped lifeless in his bathtub.

We’re talking about actual parts, pieces or entire skeletons of dead things.

No home is artistically complete without at least one skull, spinal column or stuffed raccoon.

My brother once had a femur hanging from his kitchen ceiling.

Dead things work well au natural, or you can paint, decorate or draw on them to further enhance their beauty.

You can also assemble them into striking wall hangings or figures sitting stately on a discarded rusty chair you found in the Rillito riverbed.

Unless you moonlight as a mortician or have a penchant for raiding cemeteries, it’s best to use dead animals rather than people in your dead thing art collection. It’s also best to find them dead rather than killing them just to make a wall hanging.

Art made from dead people is best left to professional exhibits, like the one coming to Tucson. Sure, “Bodies…The Exhibition” is billed as a scientific display. But I saw the similar traveling show “Our Body: The Universe Within” in Detroit and it didn’t fool me.

More cow bone art/Art and photo Ryn Gargulinski
More cow bone art/Art and photo Ryn Gargulinski

The body display is an art gallery full of dead people. One was riding a bike, another was waiting for a bus, a third was reading the newspaper. I don’t think it was the Tucson Citizen.

One dead man’s muscle tissues were cut, spread and frozen in place as if he were sporting wings and about to go flying through the science center. A bright red circulatory system hung sweetly behind glass, looking eerily similar to a jazzy disco jumper.

Of course, there are some caveats when using dead things as art. Please make sure all the fleshy parts are picked clean so you’re house doesn’t end up reeking. Also refrain from using organs, brains or other materials that are prone to rot.

And the biggest warning of all – keep dead thing art up high, far away from your dogs.

Enjoy the slide show featuring some dead thing art in and around my Tucson home (except for the worm which was photographed in Michigan).

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logoWhat do you think?

Do you have any dead thing art in your own home or office?

Will you be going to the dead people art display when it comes to Tucson next month?

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Artist Sketchbook: The art of dead things – Slide Show and Poll

From cattle bones to smirking skeletons, dead things are all over my yard.

Melange of dead things on a dead tree/Art and photo by Ryn Gargulinski
Melange of dead things on a dead tree/Art and photo by Ryn Gargulinski

The problem is – I like it.

Perhaps liking dead thing art is not a problem, as I’m not alone in my passion.

Zombie movies are always a hit on the silver screen and skeletal figurines have long held center stage in shrines and mausoleums across the globe. Heck, the Capuchin Cemetery in Rome is even constructed of monk bones.

Dead thing art lovers get a welcome respite from being called weird during October, when Halloween, Day of the Dead and the general autumnal climate makes our adoration of dead thing art appear normal.

We just know in the back of our heads the stuff rocks all year round.

Check out the slide show featuring some of my dead thing art, some of which I created this weekend to stock up for the holidays.

Also feel free to leave ghoulish – or non-ghoulish – comments and take the dead thing art poll.

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My favorite "butterfly"/Art and photo by Ryn Gargulinski
My favorite "butterfly"/Art and photo by Ryn Gargulinski

How many dead thing art pieces do you have around your own home? – No, velvet Elvis paintings don’t count, unless he’s depicted as a skeleton.

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